Is It Safe To Come Out and Play?

•April 16, 2014 • 1 Comment
Is It Safe to Come Out And Play

Is It Safe to Come Out And Play

 

Black bears cubs will be exiting their dens soon to explore a new world (about mid-April in Summit County, Colorado). Sows give birth in the January/February time frame while in their den during hibernation. Cubs can journey out of the den in 8-10 weeks with their mother to learn about foraging, climbing trees, and hunting for small animals. Be on the lookout for bears over the next few months. Be respectful and keep a safe distance from any bear families.

 

This 3-4 month old bear cub is wondering if it is safe to come out and play?

Aren’t Grizzly Bears Supposed to Hibernate?

•April 6, 2014 • 4 Comments

Yes, except when they are fed all winter long by the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, Montana.

Actually these images are of rescued and rehabilitated bears and wolves that would have otherwise died in the wild. The center is a not-for-profit, educational operation.

I recommend a visit.

Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center

 

Grandpa Grizzly

Grandpa Grizzly

 

Grizzly Dance

Grizzly Dance

 

Let A Sleeping Wolf Lie

Let A Sleeping Wolf Lie

Bear Cub Learning to Climb a Tree

•April 3, 2014 • 3 Comments

Black bears are known for their ability to climb trees. Black bear cubs learn at a very early age how to climb. They learn that trees are a refuge from danger and a great place to take a nap. Sows give birth to cubs in the January/February time frame while still in the den in hibernation. The cubs are ready to exit the den in 8-10 weeks to learn how to forage and climb trees.

We (my wife Beth and I) encountered this black bear sow and cub in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. This series of images and video tells a cute story. I am estimating that the cub is about 3-4 months old. The images were shot in early June of 2013.

 

Safe To Come Out To Play?

Safe To Come Out To Play?

On My Way

On My Way

 

 Let's Climb A Tree

Let’s Climb A Tree

 

Give Me A Boost

Give Me A Boost

 

 Up A Tree

Up A Tree

 

 Help, Get Me Out Of Here

Help, Get Me Out Of Here

Video of the cub sensing danger

Hope that you enjoy.

Rich

 

Birds of Prey

•March 30, 2014 • 1 Comment

My Birds of Prey show at the Arts Alive Gallery in Breckenridge, Colorado has been extended another month, until the end of April, 2014.

Birds of Prey Show

Some of the images in the show can be viewed here. I hope that these will inspire you to stop by the gallery and have a closer look.

Snowy Glow

Snowy Glow

My first encounter with a snowy owl was on the tundra above the Arctic Circle in Alaska while in search of polar bears. I fell in love with these beautiful owls and hoped to someday be able to get a closer, sharper, higher quality photograph than the one I shot that day. Subsequently, I traveled to South Dakota, where 30 were reported at Lake Andes. No luck. Traveled to Vancouver several times, where 20 were reported, but did not get THE shot. I made numerous trips to the fields near Denver International Airport for a reported snowy owl. I never found it.

It could be considered an obsession.

Snowy Obsession

Finally, on a trip to Calgary, Canada where the snowy owls are known to gather, I captured the photograph that I thought that I would never get. A male snowy owl (all white), flying toward the camera at sunset.

My obsession has been cured.

 

Snow Sweeper

Snow Sweeper

 

Snowy Fly-By

Snowy Fly-By

“Snowy Fly-By” – A snowy owl is on a mission as it glides towards a prey target. Snowy owls are the largest owl by weight in North America. They breed above the Arctic Circle and have been known to fly south into the US for winters.

 

Hawk Owl Hover

Hawk Owl Hover

“Hawk Owl Hover” – A Northern Hawk Owl hovers over potential prey. The Northern Hawk Owl inhabits the northern regions of the US and Canada.

 

Shipping Included

Shipping Included

“Shipping Included” – A field mouse gets a free ride by a Northern Hawk Owl.

 

Desert Ghost

Desert Ghost

“Desert Ghost” – A great horned owl flies in silence and with stealth.  This beautiful great horned owl swooped in silence just a few feet over my head and landed on a cactus stalk 10 yards from where I was standing. In between heart palpitations and rapid breathing, I was able to remember to take this picture.

 

A Different Point Of View

A Different Point Of View

“A Different Point of View” -  A burrowing owl will occasionally tilt its head. Is it doing so to be comical or to triangulate sound from potential prey?

 

Screech Owl Posing

Screech Owl Posing

“Screech Owl Posing” – A tiny owl about the size of a pint glass with a spooky, screechy sound.

 

Rainbow's End

Rainbow’s End

“Rainbow’s End” – A rainbow trout meets an untimely end as it is fished out of a local stream and delivered to the Osprey nest for a trout diner for two.

 

These are a few of the images in the exhibit. Hope that you are able to attend.

 

 

 

 

Birds of Prey Show

•February 28, 2014 • 2 Comments

You are cordially invited to view my Birds of Prey exhibit at the Arts Alive Gallery, Breckenridge, Colorado.

As the Featured Artist for the month of March, my framed prints will be viewable at the gallery from March 1 to March 31, 2014.

A reception will be held on Saturday, March 8, 2014, 4-8pm at the gallery where we can share wildlife stories.

The Saturday March 8th  reception is also our gallery Grand Reopening event for our new location in the La Cima Mall (next to the Park and Main restaurant)

Birds of Prey

Birds of Prey

Fall/Winter 2013 Newsletter

•December 15, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Have a look at my recent newsletter about our second and most exciting road trip to Denali National Park, Alaska:

My apologies to those who have already received my newsletter through other cyber channels.

Fall/Winter 2013 Newsletter

King of Denali

King of Denali

Hope that you enjoy.

Rich

Nature’s Best International Awards Recognizes “Mirror, Mirror” as a Highly Honored Winner

•November 13, 2013 • 9 Comments
Mirror Mirror

Mirror Mirror

Mirror Mirror on the wall who is the most beautiful duck of them all – me the Mandarin. Many experts judge the Mandarin duck to be the most beautiful waterbird on the planet. Both rare and colorful, one was found near Denver, Colorado.

I am very pleased to announce that Mirror, Mirror has been awarded as a Highly Honored winner in the Birds category of the Nature’s Best International Awards Competition.

The image will be published in the 2013 Nature’s Best Awards Special Edition Photography magazine.

This competition is the premier international wildlife competition on the planet, with over 24,000 entries from 50 countries.

I almost missed this photo opportunity.  My friend Gary invited me to meet him to shoot the Mandarin duck that was “in town”. The Mandarin duck is a relatively rare duck, and it was amazing that there was one on Clear Creek, near 44th avenue near Denver (actually Wheatridge), of all places. We agreed to meet at 7 am.

I arrive on time, but no Gary.  I wait for 30 minutes, still no Gary. I call several times and leave voice mail messages.  Gary calls and tells me I am at the wrong Clear Creek location.  Anxiously, I find my way. I arrive and watch in amazement as this vibrantly colored little duck swims, frolics and displays for the curious crowd.  By now I have lost the early morning light, and shadows are appearing.   Gary offers his flash, which I gladly accept. The mandarin takes a break to admire its own reflection and I am thinking “mirror, mirror on the wall…”  I fire without thinking.  The flash illuminates and freezes the moment: “Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest duck of all?   Me, the Mandarin!”

Thank you to my good friend, Gary.

Canon EOS-1D Mark IV; EF 70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS II USM lens at 140mm; 1/1250 sec at ƒ/2.8, ISO 400; Speedlite 580EX flash; hand-held.

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 117 other followers